Things to do in Person County
Uptown Roxboro

A • Person County Museum of History

309 N. Main St. Roxboro

The Person County Museum of History was founded in 1992, and through the generosity of Dorothy Brooks and family, the County was able to purchase its current property at 309 North Main Street. The quilt square is hung on an old tobacco barn donated by Marilyn Christopher. The pattern is a celebration of Person County history.
This barn is typical of the curing barns with the wooden logs and “chinking” between the logs. In the barn, the Museum displays many items associated with the growing of tobacco. The pack barn is only one of the many buildings on the Museum campus, all of which hold much of the history of Person County and is representative of the eras in which our ancestors lived. Museum visitation hours are Wednesday – Friday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm and Saturday 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm. For more information visit www.pcmuseumnc.com, on Facebook, email pcmuseum@roxboro.net or call 336.597.2884.

Quilt Square by George Buchanan • Photography by Ken Martin

Person County Museum of History

CC • Person County Tourism Development Authority

29 Reams Ave. Roxboro

The quilt square on the building wall of the Person County Tourism Development Authority at 29 Reams Avenue depicts a pineapple – the universal accepted symbol of WELCOME! This square was designed and painted by the art students at Roxboro Community School. The students were allowed to design whatever they wanted to do for this quilt square. Standing across the lot is the public art sculpture 'A Mother's Love' by Lana Frazier that was sponsored by PCTDA in partnership with the Roxboro Public Art Commission.

Quilt Square by Roxboro Community School Art Students

Photography by Erin Ganey Hill

Person County Tourism Development Authority

South West Section

AA • Southern Middle School

209 Southern Middle Sch. Rd.

Sixth grade art students at Southern Middle School created their own square as part of an undertaking to learn about the tradition and craft of quilt-making, as well as how quilts are functional works of art. Their quilt square shows the star pattern to represent that students here are shining bright! They finished the pattern with the school’s colors of blue, white, & black.

Quilt Square by Southern Middle School Art Students

Photography by Ken Martin

Southern Middle School

F • Flat River Farm • Carol Carter

280 Clay Long Rd. Hurdle Mills

Located in the Town of Flat River, this 12-acre farm site hosts a horse boarding business. The square incorporates the passions of the owner: basket weaving, horses, German Shepherds, fox hunting and beekeeping. The owner, Carol Carter, sells her honey locally. For more information, email flatriverfarm@netzero.net.

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

Flat River Farm

I • Russell Horton

7035 Hurdle Mills Rd. Hurdle Mills

Boyd and Zelia Horton purchased this farm in 1939 and raised tobacco. Interestingly enough, the deed indicated that the tobacco sticks had to stay with the land. Russell Horton, born in 1943 in the home house where original logs are still visible, began farming tobacco on this land, alongside his wife Joan, in 1960. Current crops include tobacco transplants, cattle, grain and hay. There is a smoke house and many pack houses on the property. The Pineapple Quilt pattern used was made by Joan’s mother and is hanging on a feed barn that was built in the 1950s.

Quilt Square by Roxboro Community School Art Students

Photography by Ken Martin

Russell Horton Farm

D • David & Vera Whitfield

10926 Hurdle Mills Rd. Hurdle Mills

This tobacco barn is located on the Whitfield Farm, where for many years tobacco was harvested and placed in the barn to dry. Every summer the smell of tobacco curing was a familiar smell in the community. The homeowner chose her barn quilt square because of her love of red birds. Her barn quilt square is in memory of Malissa Oakley Allen, the owner’s mother who was an avid quilter. 

Quilt Square by Amy Levine and the PCC Creative Minds Club

Photography by Ken Martin

David and Vera Whitfield

V • Mick & Harriet Whitfield Clayton

1956 Robert Whitfield Rd. Hurdle Mills

This farm has been in the Whitfield family since the mid nineteenth century through five generations. The quilt square is hung on an old barn originally built in the late 1800’s to house hay, mules and other farm animals. It was later converted into an active chicken house throughout the 1950’ and 1960’s. Their quilt square pattern is in honor of the owner’s father who raised chickens and corn, as well as sunflowers to encourage pollinators. 

Quilt Square by Kate Lagaly • Photography by Carly Long

Mick and Harriet Whitfield Clayton

C • Whitfield Family Farm • Darryl & Gwen Newton

11 Whitmore Rd. Hurdle Mills

The Whitfield Family Farm has had a proud heritage of growing tobacco and grain for multiple generations. Presently it is being farmed by the grandsons and the great grandsons of Arthur Whitfield. The barn quilt is located on the feed barn, built in the 1930's by Arthur Whitfield where cattle and farm horses were fed and cared for. It is now owned by his granddaughter and her husband. The barn quilt is a colorful kaleidoscope star representing the homeowner’s love of quilts. The family especially treasure quilts made by Darryl’s mother Rachel Long Newton, and Gwen’s grandmother Malissa Oakley Allen, who were avid quilters. 

Quilt Square by Amy Levine and the PCC Creative Minds Club • Photography by Carly Long

Whitfield Family Farm

Z • Everette & Beverly Long

334 Jim Morton Rd. Hurdle Mills

The farm has been in the Long family for three generations. The farm house was built in 1886 and remains as an active farm today, growing tobacco and grain. The quilt square pattern is the old North Carolina star, and it is hung on an old tobacco pack house. Quilt Square by Jennifer Bray Robinson

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Ken Martin

Beverly Long Farm

B • Cecil & Shelia White

350 Robert Whitfield Rd. Hurdle Mills

This large white barn was built by Walter Knox Moore in the 1930’s to house mules and a few cows. Walter Moore was a very successful tobacco farmer, being named in the 1930's as Master Farmer of Person County. In 1940, he increased his herd to start a dairy business selling milk to the Coble Milk Company in Lexington, NC. With the help of his family, milking all the cows by hand, the milk was put in five and ten gallon cans to be picked up from the farm by the Coble Milk Company. Today, Walter Moore’s grandson, Cecil White, and wife, Sheila, live on the farm. 

Quilt Square by Amy Levine and the PCC Creative Minds Club

Photography by Ken Martin

Cecil and Sheila White

Y • Cecil & Sandra Allen

6155 Burlington Rd. Roxboro

The Allen's Farm is a six generation family farm that is now growing Organic tobacco and wheat. Barlett Yancy Allen who fought with the confederacy is buried on adjoining family land. The quilt square was chosen to reflect an actual quilt made by Sandra. Alongside the quilt is a lighted star made of barbed wire from a century old fence located on the farm and the displayed US flag is made of old tobacco sticks originally used in old wood fired barns.

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Ken Martin

Cecil and Sandra Allen

E • Sunset Ridge Buffalo Farm • Jack & Sandy Pleasant

465 Yarbrough Rd. Roxboro

Sunset Ridge Buffalo Farm has been raising bison since 2001. The land has been in the Pleasant family for over 200 years, historically used to farm tobacco and dairy. The farm offers group tours throughout the year and hosts weddings and other events under a large island gazebo and tents adjacent to a beautiful lake. The square is a replica of a wall hanging quilted by wives of bison growers from three states. For more information visit www.SunsetRidgeBuffalo.com.

Quilt Square by Kate Lagaly • Photography by Ken Martin

Sunset Ridge Buffalo Farm

H • Ricky & Malinda Davis

177 Ragan Rd. Hurdle Mills

This farm was originally purchased and farmed by Sidney and Eula Dunevant Ragan. The farm prospered as a tobacco farm and sharecroppers lived off the land with a large vegetable garden. Now on the third Ragan generation owner, the farm continues as a wildlife refuge. The quilt pattern they selected is called northern star which means “by way of the norther star, you can always find your way home.”

Quilt Square by Roxboro Community School Art Students

Photography by Ken Martin

Ricky and Malinda Davis

West/North West Section

N • Danny Winstead

142 Winstead Farm Rd. Roxboro

Danny Winstead • Danny is a 3rd generation tobacco farmer. Named after his grandfather Lewis Daniel Winstead and in keeping with family tradition, the tobacco leaf was chosen for his quilt square. 

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

 

Danny Winstead

O • Donnie Clayton

739 Flem Clayton Rd. Roxboro

In 1987, Donnie and Christy Clayton purchased this land, which adjoins land owned by Donnie’s father, after farming for several years on Christy’s family’s land. This land had previously been owned by two brothers but Donnie’s grandfather managed the land and built the barn, originally used as a stable, on which the quilt square hangs. Currently, Donnie and Christy’s farm, City Lake Farm, so named because a corner touches the lake, produces tobacco transplants, grain and cattle.

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

Donnie Clayton

J • Wagstaff Inc. • Tom & John Wagstaff

5432 Semora Rd. Roxboro

The owner's great grandfather John Holeman Hester and his wife Josephine Thompson Hester moved to this farm around 1890. This fertile land near Concord Church, which John inherited from his father, was a thriving tobacco farm and he continued growing tobacco his entire life. The lands continues to be farmed, and the family has expanded into cattle, grain, hay, timber and the tobacco warehouse business. There are three quilt squares on the farm drawn from the owner's memories of growing up on the farm. One celebrates the sunflowers planted around an old tobacco pack house that dates back to the early 1900’s. Another features an Angus Bull, and the third highlights their vegetable garden.

Quilt Square by Kate Lagaly • Photography by Ken Martin

Tommy Wagstaff

T • Wagstaff Inc. • Tom & John Wagstaff

5310 Semora Rd. Roxboro

The owner's great grandfather John Holeman Hester and his wife Josephine Thompson Hester moved to this farm around 1890. This fertile land near Concord Church, which John inherited from his father, was a thriving tobacco farm and he continued growing tobacco his entire life. The lands continues to be farmed, and the family has expanded into cattle, grain, hay, timber and the tobacco warehouse business. There are three quilt squares on the farm drawn from the owner's memories of growing up on the farm. One celebrates the sunflowers planted around an old tobacco pack house that dates back to the early 1900’s. Another features an Angus Bull, and the third highlights their vegetable garden.

Quilt Square by Kate Lagaly • Photography by Ken Martin

Tommy Wagstaff

P • William Barker Farm • W.H. "Bill" & Lela Barker

423 William Barker Rd. Milton

The first Quilt Square is located on the red barn in full view and titled “Delectable Mountains.” The pattern was chosen just because of the design and colors. This Quilt Square was designed and purchased in Ashe County.
The Quilt Square on the Stable Barn is titled “Log Cabin.” This pattern is very suitable for this old Stable and Barn which is believe to be approximately 100 years old. The colors of the Quilt were chosen to match the bright green roof.

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Ken Martin

 

William Barker

W • Carl & Lillian Oakley

3545 Morton Pulliam Rd. Roxboro

The farm was called the Old Farley Place and originally owned by Miss Mildred Nichols. The current owners, Carl & Lillian Oakley purchased the farm in 1966. The land supported a family of seven through tobacco and grain production.  Horses, pigs, dogs and a cow were part of everyday life. 

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

Carl and Lillian Oakley

M • Ada Hinton

Oak Grove X Mt. Zion Rd. Roxboro

Fred and Ada Hinton purchased five acres in 2001 from the Guill family because it joined Ada’s family’s land. Ada’s family, the O. T. Evans’ family, has lived and farmed in this community for generations alongside the Guill and Ramsey families. Robert Ramsey has been instrumental in maintaining the beauty of the barn, originally a pack barn, on which the quilt is hung. He initially restored a tobacco basket and made a tobacco leaf cut-out to hang on the barn. This was the inspiration for the quilt.

Quilt Square by Roxboro Community School Art Students

Photography by Ken Martin

Robert Ramsey Farm

S • Wagstaff Inc. • Tom & John Wagstaff

2339 Country Club Rd. Roxboro

The owner's great grandfather John Holeman Hester and his wife Josephine Thompson Hester moved to this farm around 1890. This fertile land near Concord Church, which John inherited from his father, was a thriving tobacco farm and he continued growing tobacco his entire life. The lands continues to be farmed, and the family has expanded into cattle, grain, hay, timber and the tobacco warehouse business. There are three quilt squares on the farm drawn from the owner's memories of growing up on the farm. One celebrates the sunflowers planted around an old tobacco pack house that dates back to the early 1900’s. Another features an Angus Bull, and the third highlights their vegetable garden.

Quilt Square by Kate Lagaly • Photography by Ken Martin

Tommy Wagstaff

North East Section

Q • Wilkins Farm LLC • Bradsher Wilkins

790 Shiloh Church Rd. Roxboro

In the early 1900s, Robert Daniel Bailey, Bradsher Wilkins’ great-grandfather, purchased this land, which is currently farmed by Bradsher and his father Jimmy Wilkins. The quilt pattern, Star and Crescent, is one that was used by Bradsher’s grandmother, Thelma Bailey Wilkins, in making quilts for the family. The quilt square was painted by Bradsher’s mother, Susan. The quilt is hung on what had previously been a burley shed that was destroyed by a tornado and rebuilt in 2011. For more information visit www.facebook.com/WilkinsFarms or email wilkinsfarms@outlook.com.

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Ken Martin

Bradsher Wilkins Farm

G • Bob Wilkins

560 Shiloh Church Rd. Roxboro

The original construction of the log cabin was in the 1840s by Gabriel Bailey, Sr., who was the great, great Grandfather of the present owners, Robert and Deborah Wilkins. It was moved to its present location on Shiloh Church Road in 2001 from another farm which was formally owned by Gabriel Bailey. This cabin was originally used as a separate dining room from the main house, and also had a bedroom upstairs. The land it now sits on was also once part of the Bailey Estate. It was purchased by Jesse and Thelma Bailey Wilkins in 1945 from Robert D. Bailey. This quilt pattern was chosen due to the passion for quail hunting, and quail dog training of the current owner of the cabin and his father, Jesse B. Wilkins, Sr.

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

Bob Wilkins Farm

X • Sanford Farm • William & Tammy Sanford

10339 Virgilina Rd. Roxboro

The Sanford Farm has been in the family for over 100 years. The barn continues to be used as a workshop and gathering spot for family celebrations. Painted by family members, their quilt square is in the shape of a cross and painted in the colors of red, green, gray and Carolina blue. The barn is available for wedding photos.

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Ken Martin

William and Tammy Sanford

South East Section

L • Donald & Andrea Oakley

2319 Allensville Rd. Roxboro

The farm has been in the Osborne H. Oakley family for three generations with ancestral roots tracing back as far as 1803. The current owners are siblings Donald Ferrell Oakley, Joan Oakley Leibert, David Osborne Oakley, and Marilyn Oakley Sifford who inherited the farm in 1997 along with their brother Mark Oakley. They selected the log cabin quilt pattern because their mother, Remell Tingen Oakley, loved quilting and made a beautiful log cabin quilt for each of her children. The pieces she used were cut from outgrown clothing and other fabric remnants. She cut and pieced together every square and then sewed them together to make the quilts. While setting up the quilting frames, family members were invited over for a quilting party.

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Ken Martin

Donald Oakley Farm

K • Brent & Bettie Yarboro

1154 Hicks Yarborough Rd. Roxboro

This property has been in their family pre-civil war. Unsure of the construction date of the building, it is a log structure that was built when the road had a different route. The house faces the direction of the old road bed that was filled in when the State paved the Old Allensville Rd in 1986. The old road originated pre automobile. 

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Carly Long

Brent and Bettie Yarboro Farm

R • Mickie & Steve Bray

540 Evelyn Day Rd. Roxboro

The Bray Barn is a 30 acre horse farm that has been in Mickie’s family for three generations. The farm was originally used for tobacco by her grandfather Lemmie Edward Day then later by her Uncle Venoy Hoyt Day. Mickie inherited a love for quilting from both her grandmothers, Evelyn Clayton Day and Ila Lee (Dolly) Day Duncan. Mickie is now a quilter and owns a long arm quilting machine. She has passed her quilt passion onto her daughter and daughter-in-law. The Loan Star pattern quilt square was painted by her daughter as a Christmas present in 2015.

Quilt Square provided by Owner • Photography by Carly Long

Mickie and Steve Bray Farm

U • Kim & Bill Rand

1819 Houston Blalock Rd. Timberlake

This farm has been in the family for over 100 years – five generations – and continues to serve as managed pine forest. The owner’s grandmother, Ora, was a functional quilter who created quilts from scraps of curtains, clothes and other linens to keep her children and grandchildren warm. The square pattern was chosen to honor Ora by replicating a star quilt created by her and by using her favorite color, purple. Although renovated, the barn has been standing as long as living memory.

Quilt Square by Roxboro Community School Art Students

Photography by Ken Martin

Kim Rand Farm

BB • Boar’s Nest: a Dukes of Hazzard Museum

4647 Helen Moriah Rd. Rougemont

This free museum dedicated to the Dukes of Hazzard is housed in a barn packed with memorabilia from the 1980's television show. The quilt square pays tribute to the theme with the painted General Lee. The museum is listed with the state as a North Carolina Museum of Southern Culture. Historically, the owner's family farmed tobacco in Person County and the farm remains in the family. For more information, find them on facebook as Boar's Nest: a Dukes of Hazzard Museum.

Quilt Square by Chrystal Hardt • Photography by Carly Long

Boars Nest
   

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